30 April 2008

Hospiatal in SINGAPORE JCI Accredited

Hospiatal in SINGAPORE JCI Accredited

Medical Tourism in Singapore is an upcoming field, which combines medical expertise and benefits along with a memorable holiday. It is slowly but steadily developing to be on the major sites for medical tourism in Asia.

It has been recorded that Singapore attracts 200,000 patients from across the world. The government's initiative to combine tourism along with medical practices provide world-class services, expertise and infrastructure to the tourists.

Hospiatal in SINGAPORE has been JCI Accredited :

  • Alexander Hospital
  • Changi General Hospital
  • Johns Hopkins Singapore International Medical Centre
  • K K Women's And Children's Hospital
  • National Healthcare Group
  • National Heart Center Of Singapore
  • National University Hospital
  • Singapore General Hospital
  • Tan Tock Seng Hospital

27 April 2008

Guide of Medical Tourism:WHICH COUNTRIES OFFER THE BEST SERVICES?

WHICH COUNTRIES OFFER THE BEST SERVICES?
The most popular travel destinations are India, Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia, Turkey, Mexico, Panama, Costa Rica, Brazil, Belgium, and Argentina amongst others. Some of these countries are considered best for cardiac surgery, others for orthopedic surgery and yet others for cosmetic surgery. You should base your selection on: quality, distance and cost.

SOURCE BY : http://www.articlesbase.com/health-articles

Guide of Medical Tourism:MEDICAL TOURISM OFFERINGS

Guide of Medical Tourism

MEDICAL TOURISM OFFERINGS

1. Incredible Savings: Compare a $7,000 hip resurfacing in India with a $48,000 one in the US. In general you are able to save 50% to 90%.
2. Excellent Quality: Many international providers are accredited by JCI, JCAHO and ISO or by local accrediting organizations. They have world-class facilities, have access to the latest technology and provide personalized service. If in doubt, read testimonials by patients who have experienced treatment overseas.
3. Surgeon Expertise: Most surgeons catering to international patients have either been educated or have received professional training at top schools in the US
4. No Wait-Lists: Access to immediate service is what attracts those from countries that have public health care system towards medical tourism.
5. Longer Hospital Stay: You can have a longer hospital stay than possible in your local hospital back home under the supervision of your surgeon and physical therapist.
6. Travel Opportunities: While the primary motivation for most customers is affordable surgery, the opportunity to visit exotic destinations is an additional draw for some

SOURCE BY : http://www.articlesbase.com/health-articles



Compare cost of Medical Tourism

If you live in the United States or Canada, it is relatively easy to check copare cost for medical care. These are estimated cost comparisons for various popular medical care for which Medical Tourism is known. However, other factors such as Medical expertise, insurance, legal aid, ease of travel, and quality of other facilities are some reasons which may affect the costs. The slogan, “First World treatment’ at Third World prices” takes into consideration many other factors. More information on http://www.medicaltourism123.com/cost_comparision.php


The cost of cosmetic surgery abroad
http://www.treatmentabroad.com/cosmetic-abroad/cosmetic-surgery-abroad-guide/typical-costs/

Dental tourists are satisified with their treatment savings

A new survey by RevaHealth indicates that 84 percent of patients traveling abroad for dental care are satisfied and that cost savings average 60 percent of the home market price, or about 4800 Euros. Read more at RevaHealth.com

Sorce By : http://www.medtripinfo.com/

Joint Commission International

The mission of Joint Commission International is to continuously improve the safety and quality of care in the international community through the provision of education and consultation services and international accreditation.

Joint Commission International (JCI) is a division of Joint Commission Resources (JCR), the not-for-profit affiliate of The Joint Commission. For more than 50 years, The Joint Commission and its predecessor organization have been dedicated to improving the quality and safety of health care services. Today the largest accreditor of health care organizations in the United States, the Joint Commission surveys nearly 20,000 health care programs through a voluntary accreditation process.

Source By: http://www.jointcommissioninternational.org/

Medical Tourism in Malaysia

Medical Tourism Malaysia has ambitions to develop itself as a medical tourism hub. The country has excellent hospitals, English is widely spoken, and many staff have been trained to a high level in the UK or in the US. There is a highly active Association for Private Hospitals of Malaysia working to develop medical tourism. While Malaysia has a national accreditation scheme (MSQH), few of Malaysia's hospitals currently hold international healthcare accreditation.

25 April 2008

Medical Tourism in Philippines

Philippines The Philippines has been growing as a destination for medical tourism. Procedures can be performed at a fraction of the amount that a patient would spend on the same procedure in the US or Europe. Philippine medical and nursing curricula are more challenging than in many in Southeast Asia, and many Filipino doctors have acquired their postgraduate or fellowship training from well-known institutions in the US, the UK and other developed countries.

Medical centers in Metro Manila have complied to ISO standards, and are periodically and regularly undergo accreditations from Philippine's Department of Health. Others have already accredited by the American accreditation group Joint Commission International (JCI), while some are looking at UK-sourced hospital accreditation.

Medical Tourism in Singapore

Singapore Singapore Medicine is a multi-agency government initiative that aims to develop Singapore into a leading destination for health care services. In 2005, some 374,000 visitors came to Singapore purely to seek healthcare. Many patients come from neighboring countries, such as Indonesia and Malaysia, and patient numbers from Indochina, South Asia, the Middle East and Greater China are also growing. Patients from developed countries such as the United States and the UK are beginning to choose Singapore as their medical travel destination for relatively affordable health care services in a clean cosmopolitan city. A number of Singapore hospitals have US-sourced JCI accreditation, while others are looking at hospital accreditation from the UK or Australia.

Medical Tourism in Thailand

THAILAND Medical tourism is a growing segment of Thailand's tourism and health-care sectors. In 2005, one Bangkok hospital took in 150,000 treatment seekers from abroad. In 2006, medical tourism was projected to earn the country 36.4 billion baht.

Thailand offers everything from cardiac surgery to organ transplants at a price much lower than the US or Europe, in a safe, clean environment. Thai medicine also features a higher, more personalized level of nursing care than westerners are accustomed to receiving in hospitals at home. One patient who received a coronary artery bypass surgery at Bumrungrad International hospital in Bangkok said the operation cost him US$12,000 (8,200 euros), as opposed to the $100,000 (68,000 euros) he estimated the operation would have cost him at home

23 April 2008

Laser White Smile

Laser White Smile







Laser White Smile

The LaserWhite Smile whitening procedure is simple and hassle-free. In just one visit to your dentist’s office, you can sit back, relax, and walk out with the whitest, brightest smile in as little as 45 minutes.

1. Gingival protection is placed to protect your gums.

2. LaserSmile gel is professionally applied.

3. Gel is laser-activated in 15-second intervals and repeated as necessary.

4. Gel is rinsed off and gum protection is removed. You are now ready to show off your smile!

STATE-OF-THE-ART

The Laser White Smile uses the latest, most advanced state-of-the-art TCIA (Target Chromopore Accelerated-Activation) whitening technology. Utilizing the laser’s unique monochromatic characteristics, along with a proprietary wavelength-specific photon activated gel, the Laser White Smile system provides gentle, safe, fast and effective whitening for you in just one office visit!

Source:

Dental Department Samitivej Srinakarin Hospital

SAFE

The primary ingredient in the Laser White Smile gel has been used in teeth whitening for over 100 years and recognized as a safe and effective ingredient by the dental community. The dramatically shorter treatment time avoids excess heat & sensitive common to other whitening devices, promoting your comfort and safety. In addition, the Laser White Smile procedure is performed only by licensed dentists and dental professionals to further ensure your safety.

MAINTANING YOUR SMILE

After the Laser White Smile treatment, you should resume your normal dental hygiene, routine-brushing your teeth at least twice a day and flossing. However, we do recommend that you keep the consumption of staining food, such as tea, coffee, red wine, etc., to a minimum to ensure your long-lasting Laser White Smile.



21 April 2008

The Concept of Medical Tourism IV




A combination of large numbers of factors has led tothe recent increase in popularity of medical tourism the huge cost of healthcare in industrialized nations, the ease and affordability of international travel, and the advancement of technology and standards of medical service in many countries of the world.

A big draw to medical tourism is the convenience in comparison to that of other countries. Few nations that operate from a public health care systems are so taxed that it can take a long time, to get required medical care. The time duration spent for waiting for a procedure, such as a hip replacement, may be a year or more in Britain and Canada; however, in Singapore, Bangkok, Manila, Philippines or Bangalore, a patient may have their operation on the same day of their arrival.


Author: Radha Kishan

Additionally, many peoples are finding that insurance coverage either does not cover orthopedic surgery or charges unreasonable restrictions on the choice of the facility, surgeon or prosthetics to be used within the United States. Medical tourism for knee or hip replacements has came as one of the most widely accepted procedures because of the least cost and minimum difficulties concerned with traveling to and from the surgery. Colombia offers a knee replacement for about $5000 USD including all associated charges like FDA approved prosthetics and hospital stay over expenses.

17 April 2008

The Concept of Medical Tourism V

Idea pushing medical traveling assumes lower health care services fess as well as the search for medical experts, quality of care, safety, and waiting times. In he nation Canada, the number of procedures in 2005 for which patients were waiting was 782,936. Again, in the same year, Canada recorded the highest level of health spending in its history.
As per the research found in an article by the University of Delaware publication, the cost of surgery in Bolivia, Argentina, India, Thailand, Colombia, Philippines can be one tenth of what it is in the United States and sometimes even less. A heart valve replacement that would cost US$200,000 or more in the U.S., for example, goes for $10,000 in the India and that also includes round trip airfare and a vacation package. Similarly, a metal free dental bridge costs $5,500 in the U.S. and $500 in India and only $200 in the Philippines, a knee replacement in Thailand with six days of physical therapy charges about one fifth of what it would be in the States, and Lasik eye surgery costs $3,700 in the U.S. is available in many other countries for only $730.

Medical tourists may come from any parts of the world and may seek necessary health care services such as cancer treatment and brain and transplant surgery as well as complementary or 'elective' services like aesthetic treatments. While the medical tourism component might be a huge draw for few Southeast Asia nation that focus on simple procedures. India is positioning itself the primary medical tourism destination for the most complex medical procedures in the world.


Author: Radha Kishan

The Concept of Medical Tourism III

A combination of large numbers of factors has led to the recent increase in popularity of medical tourism the huge cost of healthcare in industrialized nations, the ease and affordability of international travel, and the advancement of technology and standards of medical service in many countries of the world.

A big draw to medical tourism is the convenience in comparison to that of other countries. Few nations that operate from a public health care systems are so taxed that it can take a long time, to get required medical care. The time duration spent for waiting for a procedure, such as a hip replacement, may be a year or more in Britain and Canada; however, in Singapore, Bangkok, Manila, Philippines or Bangalore, a patient may have their operation on the same day of their arrival. Additionally, many peoples are finding that insurance coverage either does not cover orthopedic surgery or charges unreasonable restrictions on the choice of the facility, surgeon or prosthetics to be used within the United States. Medical tourism for knee or hip replacements has came as one of the most widely accepted procedures because of the least cost and minimum difficulties concerned with traveling to and from the surgery. Colombia offers a knee replacement for about $5000 USD including all associated charges like FDA approved prosthetics and hospital stay over expenses.

Author: Radha Kishan

The Concept of Medical Tourism II

In the recent days, people would travel from all over the world to have surgery done in clinics in the United States; but, the changing political situation in the USA imposed unreasonable visa restrictions on many persons who in the past traveled with fewer restrictions (especially people from the Middle East). What emerged as a result of different factors, including the increasing cost of medical care service in the US, is a phenomenon which has insurance service providers, Third Party Administrators (TPA's) and self-insured organization evaluating a future stake in a burgeoning industry that has yet to be fully developed. This event in health care service is similar to the longstanding practice of sending manufacturing and service jobs offshore. However, many analyzers are surprised by the fact that services provided by medical professionals are now going the way of other industries. Likewise, few industry analyzers have noted that medical tourism will result to a $10 billion industry by 2009. The advantage to foreign doctors and clinics is obvious, but the future difficulty to American medicine remains unclear and a matter of contention in the American medical service community.
Author: Radha Kishan

Tiger Woods will miss a month after .......

Tiger Woods will miss a month after surgery on left knee

Tiger Woods had arthroscopic surgery on his left knee Tuesday to repair cartilage damage, his second operation in five years on the same knee. He is expected to miss at least a month while he recovers.

The surgery, announced on his Web site, came two days after Woods finished three shots behind Trevor Immelman in the Masters. He most likely will miss The Players Championship, but should return in time to play the U.S. Open at Torrey Pines on June 12.

Author:DOUG FERGUSON

Source by :

http://www.salon.com/wires/ap/2008/04/16/D902UDUG0_glf_woods_surgery/index.html?source=rss&aim=wires

15 April 2008

Medical Tourism in India 1

ALL INDIAIndia is one of the most reputed medical tourism destinations in the world. It is known in general for heart surgery, hip resurfacing and other areas of advanced medical science. The government hospital and private health service groups are committed to the target of making India a world leader in the industry. The industry's main focus is low cost health services. Many estimates says treatment costs in India start at around a tenth of the price of comparable treatment in America or Britain.

As an example, "Howard Staab, a self-employed, uninsured, middle aged carpenter who belong to North Carolina," needed surgery for acute mitral valve prolapse, which would have charged him a fifth of a million dollars in his home state. Staab was treated in New Delhi, the capital of India, for less than seven thousand dollars by an Indian doctor. Consider the rising popularity of "preventive health screening". At one private health care center in London a thorough men's health check-up that includes blood tests, electro-cardiogram tests, chest x-rays, and abdominal ultrasound costs ?345 ($574, ?500). A comparable check-up at a clinic operated by Delhi-based healthcare company Max Healthcare costs $84.

Author: Radha Kishan

The Concept of Medical Tourism I

Medical tourism is the act of traveling to other nations to obtain medical, services. The concept medical tourism was initially coined by the travel agencies and the media as a catchall phrase to describe a fast growing industry where people travel to different nations to obtain medical services. Leisure aspect of traveling can be included on such a medical travel trip. It includes medical health care services (inclusive of elective procedure and complex specialized surgeries) like knee/hip replacement, heart surgery, dental procedures and different cosmetic surgery.

14 April 2008

Asia/Pacific land of Medical tourism 4

New Zealand

New Zealand is a relatively new player to the medical travel market, focusing on non-acute surgical procedures and fertility treatment. Like other Commonwealth countries, New Zealand's medical system is based on the British health system. Most of its specialist physicians have received training in New Zealand and the US or the UK, and all use English as their first language. The costs of private healthcare are significantly cheaper than the US or the UK, with packages (airfare, accommodation, medical service etc) for procedures like hip replacement, or coronary artery bypass costing in total approximately 40% of the procedure cost alone in the US. Many private hospitals in New Zealand are accredited by the national accreditation agency Quality Health New Zealand (QHNZ). QHNZ, like JCI, is a member of the International Society for Quality in healthcare or ISQua.

Asia/Pacific land of Medical tourism 3

Malaysia

Malaysia has ambitions to develop itself as a medical tourism hub. The country has excellent hospitals, English is widely spoken, and many staff have been trained to a high level in the UK or in the US. There is a highly active Association for Private Hospitals of Malaysia working to develop medical tourism. While Malaysia has a national accreditation scheme (MSQH), few of Malaysia's hospitals currently hold international healthcare accreditation.

Asia/Pacific land of Medical tourism 2

India

India is known in particular for heart surgery, hip resurfacing and other areas of advanced medicine. The government and private hospital groups are committed to the goal of making India a leader in the industry. The industry's main appeal is low-cost treatment. Most estimates claim treatment costs in India start at around a tenth of the price of comparable treatment in America or Britain. India is becoming the destination of choice for US citizens seeking complicated, high-end medical procedures.

Estimates of the value of medical tourism to India go as high as $2 billion a year by 2012. The Indian government is taking steps to address infrastructure issues that hinder the country's growth in medical tourism.

The south Indian city of Chennai has been declared India's Health Capital, as it nets in 45% of health tourists from abroad and 30-40% of domestic health tourists.

Dental care has also caught on in India, with tourists coupling stays in cities like Udaipur with general check-ups and complex procedures.

12 April 2008

Asia/Pacific land of Medical tourism 1

Hong Kong

Hong Kong has 12 private hospitals and more than 50 public hospitals. A wide range of health care services are offered. All 12 of Hong Kong's private hospitals have been surveyed and accredited by the UK's Trent Accreditation Scheme since early 2001This has been a major factor in the ascent of standards in Hong Kong's private hospitals. The Trent scheme works closely with the hospitals it assesses to generate standards appropriate to the locality (with respect to culture, geography, public health, primary care interfaces etc.), and always uses combinations of UK-sourced and Hong Kong-sourced surveyors. Some of Hong Kong's private hospitals have now gone on to obtain dual international accreditation, with both Trent and JCI (and have therefore attained a standard surpassing some of the best hospitals in Thailand and Singapore). Others are looking towards dual international accreditation with Trent and the Australian group. Hong Kong public hospitals have yet to commit to external accreditation.

11 April 2008

Knee replacement surgery

knee replacement surgery

In October, our staff had the opportunity to interview one of our international patients from Bahrain, Mrs.Badriya Talib Ali Mohd, 57 years old, which came to Vibhavadi Hospital for the knee replacement surgery. Below is the content of the interview before Mrs. Badriya’s departure

: Please tell me what you feel or the symptoms before coming for treatment at Vibhavadi Hospital.

Mrs.Badriya: I have a terrible pain of my both knees for 6 months and my doctor advised me to have the knee replacement as treatment.

: You told us that you contacted other hospital in Bangkok but why did you choose Vibhavadi Hospital.


Mrs.Badriya: Vibhavadi Hospital (International Coordinator) response to my needs very quick and the costs of treatment is reasonable.

: What is your reaction when the doctor in Bahrain told you to have the knee replacement, Are you afraid?

Mrs.Badriya: No, what I want only is the pain will go away.

: When did you arrive to the hospital and when did the surgery happen?

Mrs.Badriya: We arrived to the hospital on October 8, 2007. On October 9 pre – operative procedure was performed followed by surgery the following day, October 10, 2007

: How do you feel after the surgery?

Mrs.Badriya: The pain is still there but not much.

: How was the hospital’s service and facilities?

Mrs.Badriya: It’s good; everybody was helpful and always smiling.

: What do you want to tell to those who have problem like you?

Mrs.Badriya: I want to tell to those having knee problem that don’t be afraid to have the surgery because at Vibhavadi Hospital there is Dr. Werayudth who is professional and kind to his patient.

10 April 2008

Sponsored health care by Employer

Sponsored health care by Employer

A few US employers have started offering incentives in their employee benefit packages such as paying for air travel and waiving out-of-pocket expenses for care outside of the US. For example, in January 2008, Hannaford Bros., a supermarket chain based in Maine, began paying the entire medical bill for employees to travel to Singapore for hip and knee replacements, including travel for the patient and companion. Other employers have been less public about their benefit changes.

Medical travel packages can integrate with all types of health insurance, including limited benefit plans, preferred provider organizations and high deductible health plans. Insurers are beginning to establish partnerships with overseas health providers to treat their insureds. The article cites a BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina representative who had a colonoscopy at Bumrungrad International Medical Center in Bangkok.

According to a recent case study interview in The Health Care Globalization Report, a major employee benefits management company, Plan Benefit Services, accompanied a group of employers to Bangkok and Singapore to visit facilities. This is seen as significant since up to this point, most visitors to foreign hospitals were patients, health plans and medical travel companies. According to the report, the employers attending were very close to making benefit changes that would incentivize employees to seek care overseas.

09 April 2008

Medical tourism growing worldwide

Medical tourism growing worldwide

11:34 a.m., July 25, 2005--Falling ill while abroad seems like the worst sort of traveling nightmare. Yet, for growing numbers of travelers, the lure of combining affordable medical care with attentive room service is a chief draw for packing a suitcase and boarding a plane.

Here, UDaily previews excerpts from an article by Frederick J. DeMicco, ARAMARK Chair in Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional Management and department chairperson, and Marvin Cetron, founder and president of Forecasting International, on the growing trend of medical tourism. In Q&A format, both experts share abridged portions of their views from an article soon to be published in the FIU (Florida International University) Hospitality Review.

DeMicco and Cetron, along with Owen Davies, a consultant for Forecasting International, also have coauthored a recently published book on tourism trends titled, Hospitality 2010: The Future of Hospitality and Travel.

Medical tourists have good cause to seek out care beyond the United States for many reasons. In some regions of the world, state-of-the-art medical facilities are hard to come by, if they exist at all; in other countries, the public health-care system is so overburdened that it can take years to get needed care. In Britain and Canada, for instance, the waiting period for a hip replacement can be a year or more, while in Bangkok or Bangalore, a patient can be in the operating room the morning after getting off a plane.

For many medical tourists, though, the real attraction is price. The cost of surgery in India, Thailand or South Africa can be one-tenth of what it is in the United States or Western Europe, and sometimes even less. A heart-valve replacement that would cost $200,000 or more in the U.S., for example, goes for $10,000 in India--and that includes round-trip airfare and a brief vacation package. Similarly, a metal-free dental bridge worth $5,500 in the U.S. costs $500 in India, a knee replacement in Thailand with six days of physical therapy costs about one-fifth of what it would in the States, and Lasik eye surgery worth $3,700 in the U.S. is available in many other countries for only $730. Cosmetic surgery savings are even greater: A full facelift that would cost $20,000 in the U.S. runs about $1,250 in South Africa.

Article by Becca Hutchinson

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