23 September 2008

How to MEDICAL TOURISM Know about :Do I Need to Have My Joint Replaced?

Only a doctor can tell if you need a joint replaced. He or she will look at your joint with an x-ray machine or other machines. The doctor may put a small, lighted tube (arthroscope) into your joint to look for damage. A small sample of your tissue could also be tested.

After looking at your joint, the doctor may say that you should consider exercise, walking aids like braces or canes, physical therapy, or medicines and supplements. Medicines for arthritis include drugs that reduce inflammation. Depending on the type of arthritis, the doctor may prescribe corticosteroids or other drugs. However, all drugs may cause side effects, including bone loss.

If these treatments do not work, the doctor may suggest an operation called an osteotomy (aas-tee-AAHT-oh-me), where the surgeon "aligns" the joint. Here, the surgeon cuts the bone or bones around the joint to improve alignment. This may be simpler than replacing a joint, but it may take longer to recover. However, it is not commonly done today.

Joint replacement is often the answer if you have constant pain and can't move the joint well; for example, if you have trouble with things like walking, climbing stairs, and taking a bath.

Source By :niams.nih.gov

17 September 2008

How to MEDICAL TOURISM Know about :What Is a New Joint Like?

A new joint, called a prosthesis (praas-THEE-sis), can be made of plastic, metal, or both. It may be cemented into place or not cemented, so that your bone will grow into it. Both methods may be combined to keep the new joint in place.








Illustration of an artificial hip joint

A cemented joint is used more often in older people who do not move around as much and in people with "weak" bones. The cement holds the new joint to the bone. An uncemented joint is often recommended for younger, more active people and those with good bone quality. It may take longer to heal, because it takes longer for bone to grow and attach to it.

New joints generally last at least 10 to 15 years. Therefore, younger patients may need to have the same damaged joint replaced more than once.

Source By :niams.nih.gov

13 September 2008

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09 September 2008

How to MEDICAL TOURISM Know about :What Is Joint Replacement Surgery?

Joint replacement surgery is removing a damaged joint and putting in a new one. A joint is where two or more bones come together, like the knee, hip, and shoulder. The surgery is usually done by a doctor called an orthopaedic (or-tho-PEE-dik) surgeon. Sometimes, the surgeon will not remove the whole joint, but will only replace or fix the damaged parts

The doctor may suggest a joint replacement to improve how you live. Replacing a joint can help you relieve pain and move and feel better. Joints that can be replaced include the shoulders, fingers, ankles, and elbows. Hips and knees are replaced most often.
What Can Happen to My Joints?

Joints can be damaged by arthritis and other diseases, injuries, or other causes. Arthritis or simply years of use may cause the joint to wear away. This can cause pain, stiffness, and swelling. Bones are alive, and need blood to be healthy, grow, and repair themselves. Diseases and damage inside a joint can limit blood flow, causing problems.

Source By :niams.nih.gov

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